Tapestry, from 90.3 WBHM




July 2011...



It's a little more than two months since the April 27th tornadoes carved a path of destruction through central Alabama. Many homeowners and business continue to rebuild and clean up debris. Churches were hard hit, too. As WBHM's Bradley George, many are trying to replace stained glass windows that were damaged in the storms.

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April's storms may have destroyed prized stained glass windows in Alabama churches, but the tornadoes are inspiring new artwork. Hawaiian-born Artist Caleb O'Connor had been commissioned to create 16 murals for the new federal courthouse in Tuscaloosa. The paintings depict historic scenes - from mound-building Native Americans to the Civil War to the civil rights era. But after April 27th, O'Connor decided to include a mural depicting the devastating Tuscaloosa tornado. WBHM's Andrew Yeager spoke to O'Connor in his studio at the University of Alabama. O'Connor points to his computer screen and describes the image.

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Tuscaloosa's new federal courthouse is set to open in October.



A few years ago, Clayton and Joshua Britt we're looking to form a band -- nothing too unusual there. But the brothers ended up literally stopping Zach Bevill on the street and asked him to join what would become The Farewell Drifters. The group plays what's described as harmonic roots music and they'll be in Birmingham next week. In his conversation with WBHM's Michael Krall, Bevill talks about the group's music and takes us back to that first encounter...

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As Alabama starts to pick up the pieces from the April 27th tornadoes, communities along the Gulf Coast are still recovering from last year's Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The spill not only took an economic toll, but an emotional one as well. Dale Short has the story of two women and the program they run that helps students deal with the emotional fall-out.

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Three to See logo

Let's take a trip back in time, from the end of the Cold War in the 1980s to Lousiana in 1800s. WBHM intern Nathan Reveley steps into the wayback machine in this month's Three to See.


If you'd like to share your Three to See in an upcoming month, join our crew of community producers. E-mail us at tapestry@wbhm.org. Put the words "Community Producer" in the subject line.



From the day rock and roll was born, photographers have captured musicians in moments both staged and intimate. Raw and relaxed. And while the Who Shot Rock & Roll exhibit at the Birmingham Museum of Art puts rockers on display -- it's the photographers that are the real stars. WBHM's Tanya Ott takes us on a tour.

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Who Shot Rock & Roll runs through September 18th.



The Green Seed

The Birmingham hip-hop collective The Green Seed will soon take a hiatus from performing to record a new album. The past year has been busy for the trio MCs R-Tist and Complet and DJFX. They've been performing non-stop and they also recorded a video for their track, Crack Kills.

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StoryCorps

StoryCorps is an oral history project based on the idea that the stories of everyday people are the most important and interesting of all. Each month on Tapestry we'll bring you stories from Alabamians.

Here, Dr. Michael Saag talks about the challenges of setting up an AIDS clinic in Birmingham in 1988. As a major research institution, UAB was in favor of the project. Still, Saag felt he had to be savvy about pitching the idea of an AIDS clinic to a community with a history of racial unrest.

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Dr. Michael Saag recorded from a StoryCorps booth in Birmingham talking about founding the 1917 Clinic, a comprehensive health clinic for persons living with HIV.

This interview was recorded by Story Corps, a national initiative to record and collect stories of everyday people. Excerpts were produced and edited by WBHM's Michael Krall.



Kathryn Tucker Windham

Storytelling is part of makes us human. The act of telling a story connects the teller and the listener in a powerful and intimate way. And there was no better teller of tales than Kathryn Tucker Windham, who died in her Selma home on June 12th. Windham traveled the country telling stories to audiences large and small and she wrote many books. Her last, Spit, Scarey Ann, and Sweat Bees: One Thing Leads to Another, was the occasion for our visit in the summer of 2009. I wanted to know if she remembered the first ghost story she ever heard...

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Author and storyteller Kathryn Tucker Windham died on June 12th in Selma. She was 93 years old.



Tapestry is produced by Bradley George and Michael Krall. This month, we had help from Nathan Reveley, Dale Short, Tanya Ott, and Andrew Yeager. We always welcome your feedback. You can also reach us on Facebook and Twitter. I'm Greg Bass. Thanks for listening. We'll see you next month.

If you've got a story idea for Tapestry, drop us an e-mail.