Tapestry, from 90.3 WBHM




January 8, 2009...



Solomon Seay, Jr.

The Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery bears the names of 40 men, women and children who died in the struggle for equal rights in Alabama. There were countless more foot soldiers who marched, were arrested and sometimes beaten. But permanent change could not have occurred without attorneys like Solomon Seay Jr., who worked tirelessly to desegregate Alabama. He was willing to go anywhere to confront often hostile white authorities on behalf of his clients. In 1957 when Seay began practicing law, there were only 10 Black attorneys in Alabama. In his new book, Jim Crow and Me, which he co-authored with Delores Boyd, Seay recalls his years of practice in a series of powerful vignettes that recount courtroom confrontations and constant strain. Seay says the only time he experienced real fear for himself was on a visit to Chilton County. .

Solomon Seay Jr. interview...



Lelia Josefowicz

This weekend, the Alabama Symphony Orchestra starts off 2009 with a Masterworks series titled "The British Collection". In addition to works by Mendelsson and Britten, the concert also features violinist Leila Josefowicz performing the concerto by Thomas Ades. Josefowicz spoke with WBHM's Michael Krall about the work...

Leila Josefowicz interview...



Eric Essix

Birmingham jazz man Eric Essix released his first album back in 1988 and since then he's been consistently producing music both for major labels and, in recent years, his own label. Essix has that rare combination - fierce musical chops, especially on the guitar, and a head for business. And this weekend, his latest venture takes the stage at Ona's on Southside. It's called the Southern Gentlemen's Tour. Eric Essix sat down to talk music and business of music with WBHM's Tanya Ott...

Eric Essex interview...



Tapestry is produced by Tanya Ott and Michael Krall. Next week on the program, remembering Martin Luther King Jr. through music. I'm Greg Bass, and we'll see you next week.