Tapestry, from 90.3 WBHM

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From February 15, 2007...



The Capitol Steps logo

Twenty-five years ago, some Senate staffers got together to poke fun at the people they worked for. The Capitol Steps were born of songs and skits and sarcasm to add some levity. Over the years, the nature of news has changed, but the Capitol Steps remain steadfast in their non-partisan jabs. They bring their routine to Birmingham next week and WBHM's Steve Chiotakis spoke with two of the performers, Mark Eaton and Elaina Newport - a founding member - who says the basic assumption hasn't changed much over the years.

Interview with The Capitol Steps

The Capitol Steps perform at the Alabama Theatre Friday, February 23rd at 8 p.m. Click here for tickets.



Jonathan Goldswtein

The latest production at the Virginia Samford Theatre is appropriately titled Funhouse because it takes the audience on a trip through a virtual funhouse of society. Actor Jonathan Goldstein plays a fascinating array of characters - from a death row inmate delivering his final words to a workout guru to a money-hungry televangelist. (AUDIO MONTAGE) The one-man show was written and first performed by actor/playwright/comedian Eric Bogosian at the New York Shakespeare Festival in 1983. It's filled with darkness and greed that's an earmark of sorts of the me generation of the 1980's, but actor Jonathan Goldstein tells WBHM's Tanya Ott that, while the script was written a quarter century ago, the themes still resonate today.

Jonathan Goldstein interview

Jonathan Goldstein performs Eric Bogosian's Funhouse at the Martha Moore Sykes Studio Theatre through next Saturday.



Imagine this - a scientist and an artist walk into a bar in Paris. They begin talking and then pursue a battle of wits to see whose profession is more important. Sounds like the beginning of a joke, right? But as Morgan Jones reports - the idea is much more than that.

Picasso at the Lapin Agile

Picasso at the Lapine Agile opens next week at the Virginia Samford Theatre.



Awadagin Pratt

Pianist Awadagin Pratt was raised in Normal, Illinois, but Pratt himself is anything but normal. He breaks the stereotype of your average classical musician with his dreadlocks and avoidance of tuxedos, in favor of more casual concert wear. Pratt tells WBHM's Michael Krall that his parents encouraged him to excel in whatever he did -- that meant daily lessons in piano, violin and tennis...

Awadagian Pratt interview

Pianist Awadagin Pratt gives a recital Sunday afternoon at three o'clock at the Alys Stephens Center.



To hear the audio portion of the Community Calendar from Tapestry, click here.

Want to know more? Activeculture.info is a one-stop source for finding out what's going on in the Birmingham metro area.

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Jeremiah Meyer

When you first set eyes on Jeremiah Meyer, you might think he's some sort of athlete. But the Alabama native is actually more like a gentle giant. The pop rocker has been playing the piano since age eight. He studied music for three years at Belmont University and has performed on the Celebrity Cruise Line as part of an acapella group. Recently, he performed for the Birmingham Art Association's Random Acts event and with Opera Birmingham. Jeremiah Meyer has just finished his first record, an EP titled "Rock'N'Roll". He came by the Tapestry studio to share his music and his story. (AUDIO MONTAGE) The is song "Maybe Tomorrow", from Jeremiah Meyer's debut album "Roll'N'Roll". You can catch him live at Cambridge Coffee House on Highway 280 on February 24th.



Tapestry is produced by Tanya Ott, Michael Krall and Hunter Bell. We also heard from Francesca Rosko, Steve Chiotakis and Morgan Jones and had production help from Islara Vazquez I'm Greg Bass and we'll see you next week.

Support for Tapestry comes from the Jefferson County Commission through the Jefferson County Community Arts Funds administered by the Cultural Alliance of Greater Birmingham.