Judge Rules Against Sterling, Allows LA Clippers Sale To Proceed
A California judge sided with Shelly Sterling against her husband, Donald Sterling, giving the green light to the sale of the team, which she'd arranged in May.
Sandwich Monday: The Korean Steak Sandwich
For this week's Sandwich Monday, we try a sandwich with a cult following. It's the Korean steak from Rhea's Market and Deli in San Francisco.
It's Boom Times For Pop-Up Shops As Mobile Shopping Clicks
One-click online shopping is changing how we shop. Stores with leases as short as a day are proliferating — meaning a storefront can be a designer clothing store one day and a test kitchen the next.
In Colo., An Effort To Ease Court Confusion Over Same-Sex Marriage
The Colorado attorney general has asked the state's Supreme Court to stop same-sex marriages.
After 5 Weeks Of Haggling, Congress Inks Bipartisan VA Bill
Congress has reached a bipartisan deal to reform the Department of Veterans Affairs, after nearly two months of tense negotiations.
House Votes To End Full-Fare Rule For Airline Tickets
The airline industry and its unions support the bill, which would allow them to list ticket prices without taxes and fees. Consumer groups say that will lead to deceptive marketing.
International Court Rules Against Russia In $50 Billion Decision
Russia says it will appeal an unfavorable decision by a court in The Hague. The Permanent Court of Arbitration awarded $50 billion to shareholders of the defunct Yukos oil company.
An Uneasy End To Ramadan In Gaza, Where Fighting Intensifies Once More
NPR's Emily Harris reports on the Muslim holiday of Eid in Gaza, where one where one family traces the course of three weeks of war in broken bread, temporary shelters and mourning for their dead.
Teacher Tenure Fight Spills Into N.Y., Where A New Lawsuit Brews
A new salvo has been fired in the fight over teacher tenure. A group led by former TV anchor Campbell Brown filed a complaint in New York state court, arguing that tenure laws are preventing the state from providing every child with the "sound, basic education" its constitution guarantees.
A Deal Between 'Dollar' Stores Raises The Stakes Against Wal-Mart
The slice of retail aimed at America's most budget-conscious consumers is consolidating. Dollar Tree is buying Family Dollar for $8.5 billion, a deal encouraged by activist investors Carl Icahn and Nelson Peltz. The new company will have 13,000 stores, making it a more formidable competitor — in size, at least — to Wal-Mart.
Taliban In Pakistan Derail World Polio Eradication
The militant group threatens to kill parents who immunize their children. As a result, polio has come roaring back in Pakistan. Eradication now hinges on whether the country can control the virus.
Teacher Tenure Lawsuits Spread From California To New York
Why are so many low-income and minority kids getting second-class educations in the U.S.? That question is at the center of the heated debate about tenure protections and who gets them.
Medicare's Costs Stabilize, But Its Problems Are Far From Fixed
Medicare's trust fund is projected to have money until 2030, four years longer than predicted last year. But the fund that pays for disability benefits could run dry just two years from now.
Another Appeals Court Tosses Same-Sex-Marriage Ban
A lower court's ruling that threw out a Virginia law has been upheld by the 4th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The ruling quickly led North Carolina to drop its defense of its own ban.
Netanyahu: Israel Prepared For 'Long Operation' In Gaza
Ignoring calls for a cease-fire, Israel's prime minister said the country's incursion into Gaza wouldn't halt until its "mission is accomplished."