NIH Hopes Ebola Vaccine Will Help Protect Aid Workers
Next week, the NIH begins its first clinical trial of a vaccine to prevent Ebola. NPR's Scott Simon talks to Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.
Why The British Allowed The Rotherham Abuse To Fester
The Guardian's Randeep Ramesh tells NPR's Scott Simon about the social and societal forces at work in British culture which might have contributed to the cover-up of the Rotherham child abuse case.
Fiancee Of Imprisoned Journalist Advocates For His Release
The fiancée of Al Jazeera journalist Mohammed Fahmy, jailed in Cairo, stays in touch with him and plans their wedding, even as the case languishes and world attention on it dims.
Horses And Toilets In The Kitchen: Terrible Real Estate Photos
Andy Donaldson was browsing new flats in London when he noticed that some photos in real estate ads are really, really bad. His blog and book showcase some of the worst, as he tells NPR's Scott Simon.
London Evacuees Bore A Painful Cost Of War
NPR's Scott Simon talks with Pam Hobbs about the 75th anniversary of Operation Pied Piper. She was one of the children who were evacuated from London during World War II.
Russian Incursion Continues In Ukraine
Latest news from Novoazovsk, Ukraine, where Ukrainian forces are defending the port city from what they say is a Russian invasion. NPR's Scott Simon talks to correspondent Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson from Novoazovsk.
The Wall That Defined Scotland's Past And The Vote On Its Future
The Roman emperor Hadrian built a wall two millennia ago that kept the Scottish out. On Sept. 18, the Scots hold an independence vote to decide if they want to separate from Britain.
Chinese High-Rise Worker Left Dangling After Annoyed Boy Cuts Rope
The 10-year-old watching cartoons reportedly became annoyed at the construction racket outside his window, so he took a knife and sliced through the worker's rappelling apparatus.
Week In Politics: Ukraine And The Islamic State
Regular political commentators, E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and David Brooks of The New York Times, discuss the latest in Ukraine and the actions of ISIS in Iraq and Syria.
The Spectacle Of The Beheading: A Grisly Act With A Long History
Videos and other images of beheadings have appeared with increasing frequency in recent weeks. Dawn Perlmutter, director of the Symbol Intelligence Group, discusses the symbolism of this grim ritual.
Cantinflas, With His Puns And Satire, Is Back (And Still Relevant)
Mexican actor Mario Moreno, known as Cantinflas, made dozens of films between the 1930s and 1980s. A biopic about the comic, whose humor tweaked the rich and powerful, opens in the U.S. this weekend.
Residents Join Soldiers In Shoring Up Defenses Of Key Ukrainian Port
In Ukraine, civilian volunteers are digging trenches outside the port city of Mariupol in an effort to defend their city from assault by separatist forces.
The Co-Discoverer Of Ebola Never Imagined An Outbreak Like This
In 1976, scientist Peter Piot was part of the team that discovered the Ebola virus. The epidemic today in West Africa, he says, is "absolutely unexpected and unprecedented."
Study: Kids In Orphanages Can Do As Well As Those In Foster Care
Policymakers worldwide have been calling for countries to get rid of institutions for orphans and abandoned children. A study out of Duke University offers a different perspective.
Real Vanilla Isn't Plain. It Depends On (Dare We Say It) Terroir
There's no such thing as plain vanilla — at least if you're talking about beans from the vanilla orchid. Whether it's from Tahiti or Madagascar, vanilla can be creamy, spicy or even floral.