The CQ Press recently released its "Most Dangerous Cities" list, and Birmingham ranked number six. Cityrating.com says murder in the metro area is five times higher than the national average. But what do these numbers really mean? How safe are Birmingham's streets and what can be done to make them safer? On Monday, December 17, from 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m. we explore these issues with studio guests and questions/comments from listeners.



John J. Sloan, III is currently Chairperson of the Department of Justice Sciences at UAB, where he is also an Associate Professor of Criminal Justice and Sociology. Born and raised in Detroit, he earned a B.S. and M.S. in Criminal Justice from Eastern Michigan University and a Ph.D. in Sociology from Purdue University, where he was recipient of a U.S. Department of Justice Dissertation Fellowship that funded his research on sentencing practices in Michigan. He joined the UAB faculty in 1988.

The author or co-author of over 100 scholarly articles, chapters, reports, and professional presentations, Dr. Sloan's research has been funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, with which he has served as a consultant and by various state and local agencies in Alabama. His most recent work (co-edited with Bonnie S. Fisher) is Campus Crime: Legal, Social, and Policy Perspectives (2nd edition), published by Charles C. Thomas.

Dr. Sloan and his wife, Tavis Hardin-Sloan, live in the Historic Loft District in Downtown Birmingham.



Earlier this year, Lydia and her fiance Greg were celebrating his birthday in Five Points when they were mugged by two men, then physically attacked by another group of men. The suspects were never caught. Feeling violated and emotionally drained, Lydia started blogging about that incident. Her blog grew into a myspace website that allows other victims of crime on Birmingham's Southside and elsewhere in the city to document their experiences.

~ December 17, 2007

More:

More | Listen to the Searching For Safetown series

Behind the Crime Stats

Broken Window Syndrome

Juvenile Crime

Police Ride Along

Black on Black Crime